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DIAGNOSIS: FROM WHAT LITTER …

Nobody canceled old formats and materials. Artists of the XX and XXI centuries were lucky: they had at their disposal a lot of materials invented at that time, such as stainless steel, various plastics and plastic, silicone or acrylic paint. If you can still paint with acrylic paint and create statues from some of them, some inventions of the 20th century have given rise to new forms of art. For example, a video sculpture – like those structures from a variety of TVs with a mosaic of turned on screens, which was built by the founder of the video art, Nam Joon Pike. Or video murals of Bill Viola, referring to the Renaissance painting. Sometimes, light alone is enough to create a work of art.

So, minimalist Dan Flavin marked empty spaces and planes with neon tubes. Another radically new, but at the same time as old as the media world, which has become nowadays popular, is the artist’s own body, which, thanks to the success of medicine, can literally be redrawn based on any extravagant concept. As, for example, the French artist Orlan does: she turned her own face into a work, among other things, having implanted horns under her skin of her forehead. Or the Australian artist Stelark: for the last project, he implanted a third ear under the skin of his own hand. It remains only to implant a microphone, and everyone who wants to connect to the Internet can hear the same thing that Stelark hears. There are authors who perceive their chosen unusual substances as something as personal, part of their own flesh.

Artists who created trompe l’oeil, carefully concealing their true nature, have existed at all times. But at the end of the last century, this technique has again become fashionable. Our Sergey Shekhovtsov makes sculptures that seem to be carved from hard materials, such as wood or stone, but actually carved from soft, supple foam. A textbook example of such tricks is the work of Jeff Koons: copies of inflatable toys made of stainless steel. However, the main property of both a brilliant color film-foil (Anish Kapoor, Kune or Anselm Reyle), and “mirror” steel is the ability to reflect objects. Only unlike an ordinary mirror, which helpfully substitutes itself for our reflections, do these multi-colored curved surfaces turn the surrounding reality into a decorative ornament. Maybe,